The day I shifted to my first real violin

violin,violinplaying,autism,klatz,luthier,violinmaking,studyingviolin

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klotz_mittenwaldAt this point in time I needing a larger violin,  I was tall for my age and could handle the extra stretch at still a relatively young age. The pressure you endure as a result of the initial shift in spacing as so to make the notes in tune and shift position with the correct intonation with a larger instrument is tough at each stage. Its a small size difference to look at whilst physically  viewing the caparisons, but the initial finger stretch feels larger.

It was the first instrument i had received where I felt I was partnered as a team and could start to really develop my playing in tone and technique. I could always play more than I could read. My first violin was a 8th size when I was age two. For some reason I used to pick up bows correctly as a toddler and be content propped up on the bed with a violin in my hands, I think it watching my father playing violin at home.

The real excitement was when my father returned from a violin business trip to Germany. He had visited Mittemwald, taken a picture of the statue of the violins maker for me, put it in the case with a decent bow and a 17th Century aged something,  Klotz 3/4 size violin. A real joy to play on. It felt like I was entering a new area in my violin playing where I could really start to sing. Having so much frustration in my life being diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder, i have almost used the violin a tool for myself to communicate in a way I cant in other areas of my life. My teacher had enabled me to really start to express emotion through the violin around this time, with movement, expressing with my body and violin. It really helped to free up my spirit from its insular world,  of well, mostly constant music, to being in the moment. Learning to let go rather than remaining within my inner world. My vibrato came on naturally very early, I think in grade two maybe age 5-6, all this combined with my amazing teacher.
Mrs Graham, whom really new how to communicate to me in way I understood, taught me violin from since i could first remember. Such a massive part of my violin playing and the development of my playing ability. Studying from such a young age with Mrs Grayam  made violin study a much more interesting and valuable experience.

A bit about Klotz violin Luther from Wiki

Klotz is a family of violin makers. Members of the Klotz (or Kloz) family have made violins in Mittenwald, Germany from the mid-17th century to the present. The Klotz family taught other families of the village the violin trade, and Mittenwald prospered and became well known for its violins. In A Dictionary of Music and Musicians 1900, the contributor Edward John Payne writes: “Nine-tenths of the violins which pass in the world as ‘Stainers’ were made by the Klotz family and their followers.” [1]:65 In 1856, the Bavarian government founded a school in Mittenwald to continue the violin trade.[2] Dictionaries of violin makers list more than 25 artisans by this name.[3]

Matthias I (1656–1743) founded the Mittenwald school of violin making after study with Giovanni Railich in Padua from 1672-1678,[4] Jacob Stainer[5]:49 and Nicolo Amati. He has been criticized for exercising insufficient skill or care in the selection of his wood.[6] Typical labels:

  • Mattias Klotz Geigenmacher zu Mittenwald an der Iser 1697
  • Mathias Klotz Lauten und Geigenmacher in Mittenwald an der Iser Anno 1695
  • Mathias Kloz Lautenmacher. A label of the family [5] in Mittenwalt Anno 1725.

Instruments by Sebastian I (1696–1768) are probably the most admired among the many existing examples by this family. Some instruments which have been identified as Sebastian’s work bear his father’s label. Typical labels:

  • Sebastian Klotz in Mittenwald an der Iser 1734
  • Sebastian Kloz, in Mittenwald, an 1743
  • Seb. G. Kloz in Mittenwald, 1732

A copy of a violin made by Joseph Klotz in Germany in 1794

Joseph (1743–1819), son of Sebastian, worked in a manner similar to that of his father.

The quality of their instruments varies enormously, and many inferior, unauthentic examples have labels bearing the Klotz name.

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